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The Story of NASA’s Gemini Program

NASA’s Project Gemini, which launched twelve spacecraft into Earth’s orbit between April 1964 and November 1966, was an intermediate step in the Apollo program’s ultimate goal of achieving a moon landing. The information and experience gained from the Gemini missions was vital for the success of future Apollo missions.

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(NEW!) “Flame of Revenge” – Lombard Kingdom Part 4

Buy our merch – http://www.medievalextras.com/merch Finding King Arthur: http://www.medievalextras.com/finding-king-arthur You can also get it on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/medievalpodcast It is 572. Italy, having emerged from a decades-long war between the Byzantines and Ostrogoths, has once again fallen under the hegemony of a new European superpower. Lombard military leaders sweep through the provinces, dividing their newly annexed […]

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Spears and Seaxes – Arms & Armour 500-1000AD #2

Get official Medieval! merch: http://www.medievalextras.com/merch For monthly premium content: http://www.patreon.com/medievalpodcast A great many weapons were used throughout the Middle Ages to inflict brutal, dismembering damage upon a person’s enemies. The Early Medieval Period was a particularly turbulent era, and it saw the political structure of Europe collapse and struggle to rebuild itself after the fall […]

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Early Medieval Chainmail – Arms and Armour 500-1000AD #1

“Finding King Arthur: The Once and Future King” premium episode now available for $2 at http://www.medievalextras.com/finding-king-arthur. Lifetime access. Your purchase helps us make medieval history accessible! The quintessential image of a medieval knight is a gracious, horse-mounted warrior, clad in shining plate armour. It cannot be denied that this idol is spectacular, but it is […]

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Feudalism in Anglo-Saxon England

Medieval! Extras goes live on 20 May! Vote on video/episode topics at medievalextras.com, and subscribe to our podcast so you don’t miss the launch! “There is a stinking, clamorous atmosphere hanging over the town here, itself heaving with life, oozing out of all wooden and stone structures. Every road is overrun by a mob of […]

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Saxons Introduction

In 410 AD, with the last remaining Roman legions being called to defend the mainland against Germanic invaders, Emperor Honorius advised the people of Britain to “look to their own defenses”, a statement which effectively ended the island’s connection to the Roman empire. In the power vacuum that ensued, Britain was left divided and in […]

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Vikings Introduction

Vikings. Or Northmen, Pagans, Foreigners, Rus. These and many names were given to the people who came to be one of the greatest nuisances to Europe after the Barbaric invasion and the great crisis that ended the Roman Empire. They were so feared that the Church even declared that the apocalypse was near and the […]

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History of Early Islam

Medieval! Armour & Weapons – http://www.knightsatarms.com Of the many religions prominent in the Middle Ages, just one came to both threaten Christianity on a massive scale and bestow remarkable technological and cultural advances upon Europe. It was Islam, the faith of the Middle East, the driving religion behind one of the most mighty communities in […]

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Medieval! Focus: Gregory of Tours

Welcome to Focus! These episodes are for listeners who want to gain a better understanding of the dynamics of medieval eras by learning about notable characters and aspects. Today… Gregory of Tours. We love hearing from you so let us know what episodes you want to see in this mini-series (medievalpodcast@outlook.com) Your support means the […]

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Arundel Castle (Part 1)

Taking the typical form of William the Conqueror’s fortifications, Arundel Castle was a motte-and-bailey defence built out of earth and timber. The motte would become the base of the castle’s keep. Measuring over 30 meters high, its size could be used not only to guard the river, but to intimidate the residents of Arundel into […]

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King Clovis

The Franks were fierce, intelligent and skilled in warfare. In this episode, find out how the Kingdom of the Franks expanded throughout France under their leader, King Clovis, and how he established the foundations for the greatest Christian kingdom in Western Europe. . Use code “MEDIEVAL!PODCAST10” to get 10% off all Fallensword Apparel . Research […]

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Kingdom of Italy

Fifteen days into the month of March, 493 AD, the Germanic Odoacer lies dead on the floor of Ravenna’s banquet hall, struck on the head by the sword of Theodoric himself. This time, there were no hired assassins involved. It was a personal murder, and an unexpected one, brought about by cruel treachery and hunger […]

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Odoacer

At the start of this episode, Odoacer becomes the first King of Italy and takes multiple steps to secure his new rule. But it’s all for nothing, because in less than two decades, he is attacked, tricked and killed to make way for Theodoric’s Ostrogothic Kingdom. Dedicated to Carissa Zeleski. Thanks for supporting Medieval! Music […]

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Soviet T-34: Best Tank Of WWII?

The Russian T-34 Medium Tank and its variants were certainly the most produced tanks during the Second World War, but the debate still remains over whether it was the most effective. It was easy to maintain, fast and heavily-armoured, and severely shocked the Germans when it first arrived on the front line.

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The M3 Lee – Ugliest Tank of WWII?

One might argue that the seemingly ugly, flawed and difficult-to-control M3 and its variants deserved a better treatment from its adversaries. After all, it was neither designed to be superior to the Sherman nor built to any degree of perfection, and was merely planned as an urgent combination of heavy armour and mobility with a minimal production time in […]

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AH-64 Apache – Portfolio Piece

Despite existing for a seemingly-interminable four decades since its birth, the AH-64 Apache remains the flagship helicopter of the United States military and continues in active service in Egypt, Japan, the UK, Saudi Arabia and countless more countries around the globe. Designed both to support ground operations and launch intensive attacks in the air itself, the Apache series is crucial for Boeing’s supply and logistical contract with America and AH-64s are the favored combat chopper of choice. Many countries around the world use Apache variants as their main form of aerial attack aircraft.

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The Twelve Olympians

It seems apparent that the Ancient Greeks were very fond of the number twelve. Upon multiple occassions, primarily during myths and religious tales, the number twelve has been used in relation to gods, animals, etc. The Twelve Olympians were the most important deities of Greek religion and owned their name because they lived – supposedly […]

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Ctesiphon

Said to have been built on the East side of the River Tigris by King Vardanes (or Vardanus), Ctesiphon served as the administrative capital of both the Parthian and Sassanid Empires and attracted scientists, architects and writers from all over the Middle Eastern world. It was located twenty miles south of the location where Baghdad […]

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The Ancient Roman City Of Ostia

The port city of Ostia, built at the mouth of the River Tiber, was home to between forty and sixty thousand residents during its peak. Attracting merchants, traders, farmers, patricians and builders, Rome’s central naval base proved significant in its overseas operations and enabled it to conduct widespread trade between its many provinces, notably during […]

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The Battle of Hastings

On Saturday the 14th of October, 1066, Harold Godwinson assembled his foot soldiers upon a ridge at Senlac Hill, not far from the village of Hastings. His men had marched South rapidly following the successful Battle of Stamford Bridge, and were now preparing to face William the “Bastard”, Duke of Normandy, who had invaded the […]

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Roman Coins “Pecunia”

The archaeological find you see above is called an “aureus” and is one of the most valuable and high-quality coins that were issued, minting and distributed during the late Roman Republic and Empire, up until the about the 4th century.

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Why was Alexander “the Great”?

Upon inheriting his father, Philip II’s, armies, Alexander aided the unification of the petty Greek states that had for so long warred against each other to fight a common enemy – Persia – and led his men, as a general, into an invasion of Asia. Not only was Alexander titled “great” by modern historians, but […]

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Top 10 Rules Of The Knights Templar

1. Always Obey Orders The sheer fighting skill and discipline of the Templars depended on complete obedience to instructions, and it was the duty of any of these Knights to carry out the commander’s orders to the best of his ability. No matter the circumstance, the Templars would always have to act like fighting machines […]

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The Battle Of Agincourt, 1415

Following his ascending to the throne in 1413, Henry V planned to assert his dominance over the French and possibly take the throne. As they had been engaging in smaller scales skirmishes on the English coast as well as supporting their enemies – including Scotland – Henry decided to transport his army of around 12,000 […]

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Article Updates #2

Some more work has been done on the article Take a tour of Ancient Rome, and I hope you enjoy the additions. If you yourself have something to contribute to the article, let me know!

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How to build a medieval castle

Castles were impressive structures by nearly all definitions and a key aspect of medieval society. They served as miniature administrative offices, defensive positions and markers of realms. How they were built is truly astonishing, and required huge amounts of manual, human labour without necessarily advanced measuring equipment or machinery.

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Why Did Rome Fall?

Eventually, the sun set on the Roman Empire in 476 AD when Odoacer entered Rome and deposed Romulus Augustus, the last Latin Emperor. Reasons for why Rome fell are still being debated today – but here are the most important factors for its dissolution.

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Photos From The RAMM Museum, Exeter

These are some pictures I took whilst looking around the Royal Albert Memorial Museum. The exhibitions are actually surprisingly large; there are lots of historical artifacts to blow your mind, as well as an Ancient Egyptian mummy. Hopefully you like the photos I took 🙂 17th Century Civil War armour, used by the soldiers defending […]

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Historical Brain Dump #1

This is the first ever historical brain dump. In each dump I provide ten revision facts about history that you might not know or might have forgotten. If you want more of these, comment below. Thanks! Caesar’s first invasion of Britain was in 55BC. The wheel was probably invented in about 3500-4000 BC The Battle […]

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War Caves In The Battle Of Arras

The Battle of Arras, starting on the 9th of April in 1917, was one part of a British assisted offensive doubled with the French in two directions to the North of Imperial Germany. Designed as a distraction to Triple Alliance troops, it required great precision to coordinate troops from all different nationalities, such as Canada […]

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Welcome to the Augustus

Hello there! Thanks for finding this website. Please don’t click off quite yet. My name is Joshua Potts. I like history and made this as a personal blog for other people who share my interest. I plan to post a couple things per week. If you stick around, I hope you’ll like it.

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